Earthquake Effects on Soil-Foundation Systems

  • H. Bolton Seed
  • Sibel Pamukcu
  • Ronald C. Chaney
Chapter

Abstract

The damage resulting from earthquakes may be influenced in a number of ways by the characteristics of the soils in the affected area. Where the damage is related to a gross instability of the soil, resulting in large permanent movements of the ground surface, association of the damage with the local soil conditions is readily apparent. Thus, for example, deposits of loose granular soils may be compacted by the ground vibrations induced by the earthquake, resulting in large settlements and differential settlements of the ground surface. Typical examples of damage due to this cause are shown in Figures 16.1 and 16.2. Figure 16.1 shows an island near Valdivia, Chile, which was partially submerged as a result of the combined effects of tectonic land movements and ground settlement due to compaction in the Chilean earthquake of 1960. Figure 16.2 shows differential settlement of the backfill of a bridge in the Niigata earthquake of 1964.

Keywords

Ground Motion Penetration Resistance Excess Pore Pressure Excess Pore Water Pressure Standard Penetration Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Bolton Seed
    • 1
  • Sibel Pamukcu
    • 2
  • Ronald C. Chaney
    • 3
  1. 1.University of California at BerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Lehigh UniversityUSA
  3. 3.Fred Telonicher Marine LaboratoryHumboldt State UniversityUSA

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