Cleaning and disinfection: methods

  • S. J. Forsythe
  • P. R. Hayes

Abstract

The operations of cleaning and disinfection are essential parts of food production and the efficiency with which these operations are performed greatly affects final product quality. A prerequisite for an efficient sanitation programme is that the factory and the equipment therein have been designed with high standards of hygiene in mind; the most effective sanitation programme cannot make up for basic deficiencies in equipment and factory design and if design faults exist sanitation can never be totally effective.

Keywords

Hard Water Surface Active Agent Chlorine Dioxide Bacterial Spore Detergent Formulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. J. Forsythe
    • 1
  • P. R. Hayes
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Life SciencesThe Nottingham Trent UniversityNottinghamUK
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyThe University of LeedsLeedsUK

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