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Food spoilage

  • S. J. Forsythe
  • P. R. Hayes

Abstract

Spoilage of food involves any change which renders food unacceptable for human consumption and may result from a variety of causes. It is often difficult to decide when a food is actually spoiled since views differ on what is and is not acceptable and fit or unfit to eat. These differences of opinion are particularly evident when viewed on a worldwide basis as can be illustrated by the following well-known example. The British prefer game meat to be ‘hung’ for several days to allow organoleptic changes to take place which encourage the development of a ‘strong’ flavour. Whilst the British consider such flavoured meat to be a delicacy other nationalities, including Americans, regard it as spoiled and unacceptable.

Keywords

Lactic Acid Bacterium Food Spoilage Clostridium Botulinum Food Protection Fresh Meat 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. J. Forsythe
    • 1
  • P. R. Hayes
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Life SciencesThe Nottingham Trent UniversityNottinghamUK
  2. 2.formerly of Department of MicrobiologyThe University of LeedsLeedsUK

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