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World-wide food safety programmes and legislation

  • S. J. Forsythe
  • P. R. Hayes

Abstract

Any book on legislation may be partially out of date by the time it is published, or shortly thereafter. Therefore only particular aspects concerning hygienic food production legislation will be covered in these sections; the reader must seek more up to date advice from relevant qualified personnel before acting on any matters referred to here. Since food is so widely produced and distributed, a world-wide perspective of food poisoning and the surveillance programmes which aim to monitor and control the spread of food poisoning pathogens will be discussed. The development of international microbiological standards and criteria will also be discussed.

Keywords

Council Directive Official Journal Total Viable Count Fresh Meat Food Hygiene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. J. Forsythe
    • 1
  • P. R. Hayes
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Life SciencesThe Nottingham Trent UniversityNottinghamUK
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyThe University of LeedsLeedsUK

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