Abstract

From the 1950s onwards, there have been concerns about the effect of diet upon health. High carbohydrate intake, especially sugar, was implicated in the so-called ‘diseases of affluence’, including cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes mellitus and other metabolic disorders. The role of sucrose in the incidence of dental caries has also been of great concern. The United Kingdom NACNE (NACNE, 1983) and COMA (COMA, 1984 and 1989) reports recommended certain dietary changes including significant reductions in the consumption of sugar. While the contribution of dietary sugar to obesity and other diseases was inconclusive, a link between sugar consumption and the incidence of dental caries was in evidence. The concerns reflected in these and other reports have played a major role in the commercial development of a whole range of sucrose substitutes, otherwise known as sweeteners.

Keywords

Soft Drink Sugar Alcohol European Economic Community Elsevier Apply Intense Sweetener 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

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  • S. Marie

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