Food Acquisition and Processing as a Function of Plant Chemistry

  • Peter G. Waterman

Abstract

Relatively little data exists concerning the energy and nutrient requirements of free-living primates. In the only comprehensive investigation published Nagy and Milton (1979a) recorded an average food intake of 53.5 g/kg/day of mixed fruit and immature leaves by six howler monkeys (Alouatta palliata). Of this about 35% was assimilated, representing a field energy budget of 355 kJ/ kg/day, almost twice the reported basal rate and markedly higher than the rate of 293 kJ/kg/day recorded for two caged howlers. Our knowledge of the minimum requirements of specific nutrients is similarly scant (Kerr, 1972). Protein demand can be assumed to be at least the 1 g/kg/day recommended for man, but could be appreciably higher. Most vitamin requirements are also probably comparable to those of man. Other nutrients required include Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, Cl, S, I, Fe, Cu, Se, Mo, B, Mn and V, and possibly Al, Si, Ni, Cr, Sn, Zn and Co (Kerr, 1972; Nagy and Milton, 1979b).

Keywords

Mature Leaf Condensed Tannin Food Selection Vervet Monkey Fleshy Fruit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter G. Waterman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmaceutical ChemistryUniversity of StrathclydeScotlandUK

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