Evolution of a Numerical Model for Simulating Long-Period Wave Behavior in Ocean-Estuarine Systems

  • H. Lee Butler
Part of the Marine Science book series (MR, volume 11)

Abstract

Numerical modeling of water-wave behavior has progressed rapidly in the last several years and is now generally recognized as a useful tool capable of providing solutions to many coastal engineering problems. This paper discusses the evolution of a numerical hydrodynamic model including its applications to a variety of problems in which long-wave theory is valid. To achieve a solution to the governing equations, finite difference techniques are employed on a stretched rectilinear grid system. The most recent version of the model permits a selection of solution schemes. Choices include both implicit and explicit formulations written in terms of velocity or transport dependent variables. The model predicts vertically integrated flow patterns as well as the distribution of water surface elevations. Code features include the treatment of regions which are inundated during a part of the computational cycle, subgrid barrier effects, variable grid, and a variety of permissible boundary conditions and external forcing functions. Reproduction of secondary flow effects is an important aspect for a hydrodynamic model. Discussion of methods which are appropriate for treating the nonlinear terms in the governing equations (terms which cause secondary flow effects) is given. Direction of future code developments also is discussed.

Applicability of the numerical model is demonstrated through a presentation of various ocean-estuarine system problems for which the model was applied. These include simulations of tidal circulation as well as coastal flooding from hurricane surges and tsunami waves.

Keywords

Tsunami Wave Coastal Flooding Wave Behavior Waterway Experiment Station Variable Grid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Lee Butler
    • 1
  1. 1.U. S. Army Corps of EngineersVicksburgUSA

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