Endotoxin pp 81-99 | Cite as

Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides: Relationship of Structure and Conformation to Endotoxic Activity, Serological Specificity and Biological Function

  • E. Th. Rietschel
  • L. Brade
  • U. Schade
  • U. Seydel
  • U. Zähringer
  • K. Brandenburg
  • I. Helander
  • O. Holst
  • S. Kondo
  • H. M. Kuhn
  • B. Lindner
  • E. Röhrscheidt
  • R. Russa
  • H. Labischinski
  • D. Naumann
  • H. Brade
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 256)

Abstract

Gram-negative bacteria express in their cell envelope various amphiphilic macromolecules among which the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are of special significance for bacterial viability and the interaction of bacteria with host organisms. Together with phospholipids and proteins, lipopolysaccharides form the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. This outer membrane has an asymmetric architecture, i.e., lipopolysaccharides are located exclusively in the outer leaflet through which the bacterial cell interacts with its environment.

Keywords

Outer Membrane Inner Core Partial Structure Phosphoryl Group Free Lipid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Th. Rietschel
    • 1
  • L. Brade
    • 1
  • U. Schade
    • 1
  • U. Seydel
    • 1
  • U. Zähringer
    • 1
  • K. Brandenburg
    • 1
  • I. Helander
    • 1
  • O. Holst
    • 1
  • S. Kondo
    • 1
  • H. M. Kuhn
    • 1
  • B. Lindner
    • 1
  • E. Röhrscheidt
    • 1
  • R. Russa
    • 1
  • H. Labischinski
    • 2
  • D. Naumann
    • 2
  • H. Brade
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut fur Experimentelle Biologie und MedizinForschungsinstitut BorstelBorstelGermany
  2. 2.Robert-Koch-Institut des BundesgesundheitsamtesBerlin 65Germany

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