Empirical studies in comparative politics

  • Melvin J. Hinich
  • Michael C. Munger
Chapter

Abstract

Nowhere in political science is the above statement truer than in the study of comparative politics. There have been many publications by public choice scholars, and many more by researchers who are at least sympathetic to the public choice perspective. Yet little of this work has been integrated into the main stream of comparative political science literature, and still less has made its way onto graduate readings lists.

Keywords

Public Choice Political Science Vote Share Condorcet Winner Vote Choice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melvin J. Hinich
    • 1
  • Michael C. Munger
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of GovernmentUniversity of Texas-AustinAustinUSA
  2. 2.Department of Political ScienceDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

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