How Important have Price and Quality of Service Been to Mail Volume Growth?

  • John Nankervis
  • Isabelle Carslake
  • Frank Rodriguez
Part of the Topics in Regulatory Economics and Policy Series book series (TREP, volume 31)

Abstract

Mail volumes everywhere appear to be under threat from technological substitutes such as fax, EDI, electronic mail, the Internet, and the ever expanding range of telephony services. Yet in many countries, not least in the United States where these factors are perhaps at their most developed and mail volumes per head are high, total letter mail volumes continue to rise, albeit rather more slowly than for much of the 1980s. How can this, to many, surprising conjuncture be accounted for and what factors appear to be encouraging growth in traffic volumes? Further, and perhaps more pertinently for postal operators, to what extent are these positive factors directly under the control of postal administrations themselves?

Keywords

Unit Root Error Correction Model Estimation Period Total Traffic Sales Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Nankervis
  • Isabelle Carslake
  • Frank Rodriguez

There are no affiliations available

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