A Semiautomated Device for Measuring the Geometric Parameters of Charged-Particle Tracks in Photoemulsions

  • A. E. Voronkov
  • G. E. Belovitskii
  • L. N. Kolesnikova
  • V. S. Marenkov
  • M. F. Solov’eva
  • L. V. Sukhov
  • P. N. Komolov
Part of the The Lebedev Physics Institute Series book series (LPIS, volume 42)

Abstract

Lately, in order to increase the speed and accuracy of measurements of the parameters of charged particle tracks in nuclear photographic emulsions, considerable importance has been attached to semiautomated scanning and measuring devices. A great many such devices have been designed and built [1–10]. Usually they comprise a standard or specially fabricated instrument microscope and specialized ancillary equipment. Other special equipment is used to convert the instantaneous coordinates of the microscope platform into digital numbers. Sometimes the platforms are equipped with drive motors. Electronic devices utilizing perforation or magnetic recording techniques transform the acquired information into a form suitable for input to digital computers. In some case the required computations are performed in the instrument itself, and the readout of data is accomplished by means of digital printers [4, 6, 8]. The participation of the operator in semiautomated devices is limited to visual inspection of the photoemulsion and tracking of the particles by manual or motor-driven control.

Keywords

Neutron Energy Nuclear Photographic Emulsion Recoil Proton Card Punch Digital Printer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. E. Voronkov
  • G. E. Belovitskii
  • L. N. Kolesnikova
  • V. S. Marenkov
  • M. F. Solov’eva
  • L. V. Sukhov
  • P. N. Komolov

There are no affiliations available

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