Kinetics of Oxidative Decarboxylases

  • Keith Dalziel
Part of the Nato Science Series A: (closed) book series (NSSA, volume 81)

Abstract

A common approach to understanding enzymic catalysis is to dissect the overall reaction into likely steps and study the kinetics of each of them in isolation by fast reaction techniques.

Keywords

Progress Curve Isocitrate Dehydrogenase Malic Enzyme Single Exponential Function Oxidative Decarboxylation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith Dalziel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of OxfordOxfordEngland

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