Signatures of Life

  • Bruce Dorminey
Chapter

Abstract

On a side street in the back end of Paris’s Latin Quarter, sandwiched between a boarding school and neighborhood post office, stands the building that once housed Louis Pasteur’s lab. Here, in the latter half of the nineteenth century, the renowned chemist and microbiologist found a vaccine for rabies, developed the process that came to be known as pasteurization, and pondered a discovery that he suspected could have profound ramifications for the structure of life on Earth, if not the entire Universe.

Keywords

Solar System Tartaric Acid Carbonaceous Chondrite Oort Cloud Microbial Life 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce Dorminey
    • 1
  1. 1.ParisFrance

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