Radio Frequency Selection and Interference Prevention

  • Norman F. de Groot
Part of the Applications of Communications Theory book series (ACTH)

Abstract

Successful radio communication between spacecraft and earth stations depends upon the use of appropriate radio frequencies and upon having sufficient freedom from interference. Radio frequencies for deep-space research may be chosen from bands that are allocated for that purpose. The choice of particular frequencies within those bands is guided mostly by the need to avoid interference between deep-space missions. Interference may also result from terrestrial sources making transmissions not related to space research.

Keywords

Interference Power Channel Selection Frequency Assignment Radio Frequency Interference Interference Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman F. de Groot

There are no affiliations available

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