Set Accelerating Admixtures

  • Vance H. Dodson

Abstract

Set accelerating admixtures are best defined as those which, when added to concrete, mortar or paste, increase the rate of hydration of hydraulic cement, shorten the time of setting and increase the rate of early strength development. This class of admixtures is designated as Type C or Type E, and their performance requirements in portland cement concrete are specified in ASTM C494 [1]. Some of those requirements have been previously listed in Table 2–1.

Keywords

Compressive Strength Calcium Chloride Portland Cement Calcium Silicate Hydrate Calcium Salt 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vance H. Dodson

There are no affiliations available

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