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Stochastic Automata Networks

  • Brigitte Plateau
  • William J. Stewart
Part of the International Series in Operations Research & Management Science book series (ISOR, volume 24)

Abstract

A Stochastic Automata Network (SAN) consists of a number of individual stochastic automata that operate more or less independently of each other. Each individual automaton, A, is represented by a number of states and rules that govern the manner in which it moves from one state to the next. The state of an automaton at any time t is just the state it occupies at time t and the state of the SAN at time t is given by the state of each of its constituent automata.

Keywords

Markov Chain Tensor Product Transition Rate Local Transition Infinitesimal Generator 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brigitte Plateau
    • 1
  • William J. Stewart
    • 2
  1. 1.LMC — IMAG — INPGCampus UniversitaireGrenoble — Cedex 9France
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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