The Expressive Language Characteristics of Autistic Children Compared with Mentally Retarded or Specific Language-Impaired Children

  • Linda Swisher
  • M. J. Demetras
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

For purposes of this chapter, the three developmental disorders of autism, mental retardation, and specific language impairment will be defined as follows:

Keywords

Expressive Language Specific Language Impairment Autistic Group Retarded Child Expressive Language Skill 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Swisher
    • 1
  • M. J. Demetras
    • 1
  1. 1.Early Childhood Language Research Laboratory, Department of Speech and Hearing SciencesUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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