The TEACCH Communication Curriculum

  • Linda R. Watson
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

The curriculum described in this chapter is being developed at Division TEACCH (Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication-handicapped CHildren), a statewide program serving autistic and communication-handicapped persons and their families in North Carolina (Reichler & Schopler, 1976). Through a network of five regional centers, TEACCH provides diagnostic, evaluation, and treatment services, working with individual families to develop teaching programs focusing on the areas of the handicapped child’s behavior and development that are of most concern to the family. In addition, TEACCH provides staff training and consultation to local programs serving autistic persons throughout the state and around the country. These local programs include group homes, vocational settings, and classrooms.

Keywords

Autistic Child Semantic Category Peanut Butter Skill Area Teaching Objective 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda R. Watson
    • 1
  1. 1.Division TEACCHUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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