Fundamentals of Plasma Chemistry

  • Srinivasan Sivaram

Abstract

Up to now we have considered CVD processes in which the source of energy for the forward process of endothermic reactions was purely thermal. However, interactions involving charged particles produced in a plasma have been effectively utilized in various CVD processes to reduce reaction temperatures. Figure 6.1 illustrates the familiar energy diagram for a reaction: reaction pathway X is the one we have previously considered in thermal CVD, where the forward reaction between reactants A and B has to overcome the potential hill, corresponding to an activation energy. However, the presence of charged particles opens up new reaction pathways such as Y, with a lower activation energy.1 The lowering of the activation energy through the formation of excited species A* and B* allows the forward reaction to proceed at lower substrate temperatures or at increased rates for the same temperature when compared with thermal CVD.

Keywords

Chemical Vapor Deposition Glow Discharge Plasma Chemistry Debye Length Collision Cross Section 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

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  • Srinivasan Sivaram

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