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Chemical Equilibrium and Kinetics

  • Srinivasan Sivaram

Abstract

The central feature of chemical vapor deposition is the presence of a heterogeneous reaction on the surface over which we intend to grow the thin film. This reaction is usually endothermic and the energy needed for the forward progress of this reaction can come from many sources: thermal, electrical plasmas, photons, etc. The earliest and most common means of supplying energy to the CVD reaction is by heating the substrate and this technique is commonly referred to as thermal CVD. We will begin our discussion of thermal CVD by concentrating on two constraints placed on the reaction by the economics of a manufacturing process: how much of the reactants are converted to products and how quickly this can be accomplished.

Keywords

Chemical Vapor Deposition Chemical Equilibrium Arrhenius Plot Free Energy Change Elementary Reaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Srinivasan Sivaram

There are no affiliations available

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