Serotonergic Functioning in Partner-Abusive Men

  • Alan Rosenbaum
  • Susan S. Abend
  • Paul J. Gearan
  • Kenneth E. Fletcher
Part of the Nato ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 292)

Abstract

Interpersonal aggression is one of the most significant problems confronting contemporary society. People are concerned for their personal safety not only in the streets, but in their homes, schools, and places of employment, as well. Currently, the political rhetoric is focused on punishment based deterrence; building more prisons and enforcing sentences. Despite mounting evidence that exposure to violence while growing up is a major contributor to violent crime, the preventive impact of addressing intrafamilial aggression is rarely mentioned as a potential antidote to societal violence. Irrespective of its contribution to violence in society, relationship aggression is a serious problem in its own right, affecting approximately a third of the married/dating population. Reducing such aggression requires prevention and treatment, and developing effective interventions is predicated on an understanding of the etiology and dynamics of the problem.

Keywords

Head Injury Serotonergic Activity Prolactin Response Partner Abusive Repeated Measure MANOV 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Rosenbaum
    • 1
  • Susan S. Abend
    • 1
  • Paul J. Gearan
    • 1
  • Kenneth E. Fletcher
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA

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