Prefrontal Dysfunction in Murderers Lacking Psychosocial Deficits

  • Jacqueline Stoddard
  • Adrian Raine
  • Susan Bihrle
  • Monte Buchsbaum
Part of the Nato ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 292)

Abstract

Very few biological studies of violence have taken psychosocial influences into account as moderators of biology-violence relationships (Brennan et al, in press). Some studies have, however, shown that links between psychophysiological functioning (resting heart rate and the conditioned electrodermal response) and antisocial behavior is strongest in antisocials who come from benign social backgrounds (high social class, intact homes). Conversely, such links are minimized or even reversed in antisocials with psychosocial deficits (low SES, broken homes).

Keywords

Antisocial Behavior Rest Heart Rate High Social Class Psychosocial Influence Break Home 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Brennan, P.A & Raine A. (In press) Recent biosocial advances in antisocial behavior research. Clinical Psychology Review.Google Scholar
  2. Raine, A., Buchsbaum, M.S., & LaCasse, L. (In press) Brain abnormalities in murderers indicated by positron emission tomography. Biological Psychiatry.Google Scholar
  3. Raine, A., Buchsbaum, M.S., Stanley, J., Lottenberg, S., Abel, & Stoddard, J. (1994). Selective reductions in pre-frontal glucose metabolism in murderers assessed with positron emission tomography. Society of Biological Psychiatry, 36, 365–373.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacqueline Stoddard
    • 1
  • Adrian Raine
    • 2
  • Susan Bihrle
    • 2
  • Monte Buchsbaum
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Preventive Medicine Institute for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention ResearchSchool of MedicineUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryMt. Sinai Medical SchoolNew YorkUSA

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