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Introduction

  • Petros Ioannou
Chapter

Abstract

The United States had managed to develop one of the biggest and most efficient roadway systems in the world that provided mobility, allowed the expansion of cities, and changed the life-style of people and the way they conduct business. The demand on the roadway system, however, kept increasing to the point that the construction of new highways is not as feasible as it used to be because of increasing land and labor costs, environmental considerations, and the long time required for construction. The lack of additional highways to meet the demand for traffic capacity led to congestion and inefficient usage of the current system. Congestion causes travel delays and inefficient movement of vehicles that reduces productivity, wastes energy, increases pollution, and adversely affects the quality of life. With more people driving today than ever before, traffic accidents are taking their toll in terms of congestion, productivity, and loss of life.

Keywords

Intelligent Transportation Society Test Track Intelligent Vehicle Highway System Automatic Steering 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Petros Ioannou
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Advanced Transportation TechnologiesUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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