Luminescence and Nonradiative Processes in Porous Glasses

  • Renata Reisfeld
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 249)

Abstract

Porous glasses can be obtained by selective leaching of borosilicate precursors or by the new technique of the sol-gel process. The latter uses tetraalkoxysilanes as monomeric glass precursors. Inorganic ions or organic molecules exhibiting luminescence properties are incorporated into the porous glasses at room temperature. The radiative and nonradiative processes in the glasses and the connection between the luminescent properties and the interaction of the ions with the surrounding medium can be calculated from the luminescent behaviour of the emitting species. These properties will be discussed and the physics of the processes elaborated in detail.

Keywords

Boric Acid Porous Glass Silicate Group Vycor Glass Radiative Transition Probability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Renata Reisfeld
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Inorganic and Analytical ChemistryThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael

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