Environments for Older Persons with Cognitive Impairments

Toward an Integration of Research and Practice
  • Gerald D. Weisman
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Environment, Behavior and Design book series (AEBD, volume 4)

Abstract

The relationship between older persons and the environments they occupy has constituted a continuing focus for both research and practice since the earliest days of environment—behavior (EB) studies. Environment—aging work has made major contributions in shaping the goals, theories, and methods of the larger field of EB studies of which it is a part. A number of the pioneering studies of both personal space and territoriality were carried out in geriatric settings (e.g., DeLong, 1970; Lipman, 1967; Sommer, 1959). Two major volumes on theory development in environment and aging (Lawton, Windley, & Byerts, 1982; Pastalan & Carson, 1970) have been widely utilized outside of an aging context, as has Lawton and Nahemow’s Ecological Theory of Aging (Lawton & Nahemow, 1973; Nahemow, 1990). Proceedings of the annual conferences of the Environmental Design Research Association regularly include multiple entries related to the elderly (Wener & Szigeti, 1988).

Keywords

Nursing Home Family Caregiver Physical Setting Dine Room Personal Item 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald D. Weisman
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute on Aging and the Environment, School of Architecture and Urban PlanningUniversity of Wisconsin-MilwaukeeMilwaukeeUSA

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