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Does the Cochlear Amplifier Produce Reactive or Resistive Forces?

  • Paul J. Kolston
  • Guido F. Smoorenburg
Part of the Lecture Notes in Biomathematics book series (LNBM, volume 87)

Abstract

The response of the cochlea exhibits a peak that is very sensitive to its physiological state. It is virtually certain that this response peak is produced by mechanical force generators within the cochlea which alter the mechanics of the basilar membrane (EM) in a frequency and place specific manner. These extra. metabolically-sensitive processes have been given the name cochlear amplifier (Davis, 1983). In order to understand how the cochlear amplifier (CA) is coupled to BM mechanics. it is necessary to have a cochlear model which properly accounts for the three dimensional structure of the cochlear partition. Owing to the structural complexity of the organ of Corti no such model yet exists, and hence great care must be exercised when interpreting the results obtained from cochlear modelling studies (Kolston, 1990).

Keywords

Outer Hair Cell Basilar Membrane Tuning Curve Imaginary Component Cochlear Amplifier 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul J. Kolston
    • 1
  • Guido F. Smoorenburg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OtorhinolaryngologyUniversity Hospital UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands

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