Time in History and Culture

  • Klaus Mainzer
Chapter
Part of the Little book series book series (LBS)

Abstract

Historical cultures, like individuals, developed different internal times in the course of their evolution. As a result, philosophers of history have offered different temporal models to explain the birth and demise of historical cultures. The theory of complex system also allows us to model the dynamical development of social, economic, and cultural systems. In this chapter, we will learn that at least some aspects of irreversible temporal developments in human society may be analyzed by methods analogous to those used for physical and biological processes. But this does not imply a naturalistic reductionism. In historical and technological cultures, time represents the emergence of a new phase of biological and socio-cultural evolution.

Keywords

Biological Evolution Historical Culture World History Human Consciousness Complex Dynamic System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Klaus Mainzer
    • 1
  1. 1.AugsburgGermany

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