Women Employment and Information Technology A View from the United Kingdom

  • Diane Whitehouse

Abstract

WOMEN represent more than fifty per cent of the United Kingdom’s popu­lation, constitute forty per cent of its workforce and yet account for less than ten per cent of its computer personnel [Women’s National Commission, 1984]. In its early days, computing was seen as a growth industry that provided an important field of opportunity for women. It may again be seen in that light. In the late 1980s, the information technology industry, cognisant of skills shortages in its field, has realised that attracting a female labour force may be one means of relieving this crisis. Throughout the 1980s, feminists in the computing profession, educational­ists, and labour market and labour process theorists, all discerned a number of problem issues affecting women in relation to information technology, computing and engineering.

Keywords

Labour Market Affirmative Action Skill Shortage British Broadcasting Corporation Engineer Council 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

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  • Diane Whitehouse

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