Computers and Organizations

  • Andrew Clement

Abstract

ANY attempt to redirect Information Technology (IT) to serve social needs must recognize that fundamentally it is an organizational process. On the one hand, organizations provide an essential context for the themes with which this book is concerned. Many of the societal implications, such as workforce displacement and deskilling or the invasion and protection of privacy of citizens,[1] flow from the choices made by organizational decision makers about how and why they implement IT systems.

Keywords

Information Processing Technique Technological Determinism Organizational Choice Office Automation Organizational Decision Maker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew Clement

There are no affiliations available

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