Plasma Non-Esterified Fatty Acid Composition is Different in Lactating and in Nonpregnant Nonlactating Women

  • Alexandre G. Torres
  • Jacqueline G. Ney
  • Mirna Ribeiro
  • Nadia M. F. Trugo
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 554)

Abstract

The endocrine changes that occur in human lactation lead to increased mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue and may result in altered plasma levels of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) (Neville et al. 1994). Fasting total NEFA concentration in plasma is elevated in lactating compared with nonlactating women three to six months postpartum (Butte et al. 1999), but the composition of individual NEFA in plasma from lactating women has not been determined. Fatty acid mobilization from adipose tissue is a selective process, influenced by the fatty acid structure (Raclot et al. 1997). During lactation, mobilization of individual fatty acids might be selectively affected and result in altered plasma NEFA composition. Since adipose tissue seems to be the most important source of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in human milk (Demmelmair et al. 1998), these alterations could affect PUFA transfer to milk.

Keywords

Human Milk Lactate Woman Individual Fatty Acid Fatty Acid Structure Fatty Acid Mobilization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexandre G. Torres
    • 1
  • Jacqueline G. Ney
    • 1
  • Mirna Ribeiro
    • 1
  • Nadia M. F. Trugo
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratório de Bioquímica Nutricional e de Alimentos, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de QuimicaUniversidade Federal do rio de JaneiroBrazil

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