Influence of Recent Dietary Intake on Plasma and Human Milk Levels of Carotenoids and Retinol in Brazilian Nursing Women

  • Flavia Meneses
  • Alexandre G. Torres
  • Nadia M. F. Trugo
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 554)

Abstract

Retinol concentration in human milk is considered a better indicator of changes in maternal vitamin A status than serum levels (Rice et al. 2000). Carotenoid distribution pattern and concentrations in human milk vary widely worldwide and may be related to the characteristics of the local diet (Canfield et al. 2002). Although carotenoid concentrations in plasma may be used as biomarkers of dietary intake, correlations for individual carotenoids vary substantially (El-Sohemy et al. 2002). Supplementation of lactating women with single doses of vitamin A and β-carotene, in amounts several times higher than those obtained through daily dietary intake, increases plasma and milk levels of the respective nutrient (Stoltzfus et al. 1993; Canfield et al. 1997). However, the responses of retinol concentration in human milk and of carotenoid concentrations in both maternal plasma and milk to short-term changes in dietary intake have not been evaluated.

Keywords

Dietary Intake Human Milk Lactate Woman Carotenoid Concentration Maternal Vitamin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Flavia Meneses
    • 1
  • Alexandre G. Torres
    • 1
  • Nadia M. F. Trugo
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratório de Bioquímica Nutricional e de Alimentos, Instituto de QuímicaUniversidade Federal do Rio de JaneiroBrazil

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