Advertisement

Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Public Opinion about Breastfeeding: The 1999–2000 Healthstyles Surveys in the United States

  • Ruowei Li
  • Fred Fridinger
  • Laurence Grummer-Strawn
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 554)

Abstract

African American women in the United States have been reported to be less likely than whites to initiate and maintain breastfeeding (Li et al. 2002; Ryan 1997). Previous studies examining the basis of racial/ethnic disparities in breastfeeding behaviors mainly involved pregnant and lactating women (Scott 1999; Tan & Jeffery 1995). Because women’s choices of feeding practice are influenced by attitudes of people with whom they have contact (Humphreys et al. 1998), understanding the racial/ethnic disparities in public opinions that shape women’s breastfeeding behaviors is important. The purpose of this study was to examine racial/ethnic disparities in public knowledge about the health benefits of breastfeeding and public perceptions about barriers to breastfeeding.

Keywords

Public Opinion African American Woman Multiple Logistic Regression Analysis Exclusive Breastfeed Public Perception 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bentley ME, Gavin L, Black MM, Teti L. Infant feeding practices of low-income, African American adolescent mothers: An ecological, multigenerational perspective. Soc Sci Med 1999;49:1085–1100.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Humphreys A, Thompson N, Miner K. Intention to breastfeed in low-income pregnant women: The role of social support and previous experience. Birth 1998;25:167–174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Li R, Ogden C, Ballew C, Gillespie C, Grummer-Strawn L. The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding among U.S. infants: The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Am J Public Health 2002;92:1107–1110.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. McLeroy KR, Bibeau D, Steckler A, Glanz K. An ecological perspective on health promotion programs. Health EduQ 1988;15:251–377.Google Scholar
  5. Ryan AS. The resurgence of breastfeeding in the United States. Pediatrics 1997;99:1–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Scott JA. Factors associated with the initiation and duration of breastfeeding: a review of the literature. Breastfeeding Rev 1999;7:5–16.Google Scholar
  7. Tan JC, Jeffery HE. Factors that influence the choice of infant feeding. J Paediatr Child Health. 1995;31:375–378.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. [USHHS] United States Department of Health and Human Services. HHS Blueprint for Action on Breastfeeding. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2000.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruowei Li
    • 1
  • Fred Fridinger
    • 1
  • Laurence Grummer-Strawn
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA

Personalised recommendations