Radiation Risk

  • S. James Adelstein

Abstract

The practitioner of pediatric nuclear medicine should have some knowledge of radiation effects and the potential hazards that may result from low-level radiation exposures. There are several reasons such knowledge is essential. First, specialists should assure themselves that the exposure of patients to doses from diagnostic or therapeutic procedures is not excessive. Although all current radiopharmaceuticals deliver radiation doses within a readily acceptable range, such was not the case 30 years ago when the radionuclides employed were generally longer-lived and emitted significant particulate radiation, e.g., iodine-131, strontium-85. As a result, before 1970 at The Children’s Hospital in Boston, radionuclides were administered only to patients with advanced neoplastic diseases. Even today, with the introduction of each new agent it is imperative to understand the kinetics of distribution and the radiation doses delivered to various organs.

Keywords

Dose Rate National Council Radiation Protection Radiation Risk Ation Risk 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. James Adelstein

There are no affiliations available

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