Basics of Laser Machining

  • George Chryssolouris
Part of the Mechanical Engineering Series book series (MES)

Abstract

This chapter introduces the basic physical mechanisms in laser machining processes. Laser machining can be divided into one, two and three-dimensional processes by differentiating the kinematics of the erosion front during beam/material interaction. All laser machining processes exhibit common characteristics such as molten layer formation, possible plasma formation, and beam reflection from the erosion front. This chapter also discusses the major components required for a laser machining system: the laser, the beam delivery subsystem, the workpiece positioning subsystem, and auxiliary devices. Finally, possible real-time sensing techniques and approaches for closed-loop control of laser machining processes are discussed.

Keywords

Acoustic Emission Material Removal Rate Laser Cutting Groove Depth Laser Machine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Chryssolouris
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Manufacturing and ProductivityMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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