Effects of Man-Made Channels on Estuaries: An Example, Apalachicola Bay, Florida

  • Donald C. Raney
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes on Coastal and Estuarine Studies book series (COASTAL, volume 29)

Abstract

This research demonstrates the importance of proper analysis and investigation of any man-made channel proposed for an estuary. Even small physical changes to an estuary may introduce significant and undesirable environmental changes. Estuaries having a small tidal range and several entrances and fresh water inflows particularly may be vulnerable to modifications of the complex relationship between the various sources of flow. Sikes Cut, a small man-made channel in Apalachicola Bay, Florida is used for illustrative purposes. A previously calibrated and verified numerical model of Apalachicola Bay is used to quantify the effects of the channel on Apalachicola Bay. Numerical model results are used to discuss salinity changes introduced in the estuary by the channel.

Keywords

Surface Elevation River Inflow High Salinity Water Water Surface Elevation Finite Difference Grid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald C. Raney
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA

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