Patient Outcomes of Health Care: Integrating Data into Management Information Systems

  • Donald M. Steinwachs
Part of the Health Informatics Series book series (HI)

Abstract

Striking changes are occurring in the American healthcare system. Public confidence in the quality of care provided by doctors and hospitals has been shaken. The Institute of Medicine report, To Err is Human [1], published in 2000, found that more people are killed annually by mistakes in medicine than by car accidents. The more recent report, Crossing the Quality Chasm [2] in 2001, calls for fundamental restructuring of American health care to assure high-quality chronic disease care. At the same time, substantial increases in healthcare costs are facing all payers, after a number of years of relatively flat costs associated with the growth of managed care. In many cases the increases in costs are being passed on to consumers through higher coinsurance and copayment rates for hospitals, doctors, and medications.

Keywords

Management Information System Manage Care Organization Patient Questionnaire Clinical Information System Administrative Data Source 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald M. Steinwachs
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Health Policy and ManagementJohns Hopkins School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA

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