Family Medicine pp 1803-1821 | Cite as

Classification Systems

  • Jack Froom

Abstract

Francois Bossier de Lacroix (1706–1777) has been credited with the first systematic classification of diseases, published under the title of Nosologalia Methodica. Important additional early contributions to the science of nosology came from William Farr (1807–1883) and Mark d’Espine, who created classifications and used them for statistical purposes. Jacques Bertillon (1851–1922) produced the Bertillon classification of causes of death, which eventually became the basis for what is now known as the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). Beginning with the first revision in 1900, subsequent revisions have been produced at approximately 10-year intervals. The most current is the ninth revision (ICD-9),1 published in 1979. It has been modified for use in the United States as the International Classification of Diseases—Ninth Revision—Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM).2

Keywords

Code Number Otitis Externa Benign Neoplasm Seborrheic Dermatitis National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack Froom

There are no affiliations available

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