Family Medicine pp 1713-1725 | Cite as

Intergenerational Family Problems

  • Linda Fabry Farley
  • Eugene S. FarleyJr.

Abstract

The intergenerational family is basic to our existence. There is no such thing as a one-generation family, although there are one-generation family segments. Most families consist, at the minimum, of three generations—child, parent, and grandparent. Separation by death or geography may lessen, but does not remove, the impact of any member on the function of the existing family or family segment.

Keywords

Family Physician Family Therapy Adult Child Family Doctor Teenage Pregnancy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Fabry Farley
  • Eugene S. FarleyJr.

There are no affiliations available

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