Family Medicine pp 1650-1661 | Cite as

Drug Abuse and Dependence

  • Kenneth F. Kessel
  • Paul Guistolise

Abstract

The use of substances for the purpose of altering the physical and psychological state is as old as the history of man. Nearly every culture has documented the use of substances for physical, medical, and psychological purposes. Although substance use is a natural phenomenon for man, not all use promotes physical or psychological health. Therefore it is necessary to distinguish between use and abuse of substances. The criterion accepted is: Substance use becomes substance abuse when the ingestion interferes with the appropriate physical,intrapsychic, interpersonal, social, and/or legal functioning of the person.

Keywords

Chronic User Central Nervous System Depressant Central Nervous System Stimulant Cross Tolerance Substance Abuse Counselor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth F. Kessel
  • Paul Guistolise

There are no affiliations available

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