Conservation and Contrariety: The Logical Foundations of Cartesian Physics

  • Peter Damerow
  • Gideon Freudenthal
  • Peter Mclaughlin
  • Jürgen Renn
Part of the Sources and Studies in the History of Mathematics and Physical Sciences book series (SHMP)

Abstract

The general theory of matter presented by Descartes in the second book of the Principia Philosophiae is the first well founded systematic physical theory of modem science; for it explicitly introduces the logical presuppositions necessary for a system of causal explanations of physical phenomena using equations. While it is true that Descartes himself takes very little advantage of the possibilities created by the introduction of these prerequisites (there is, for instance, very little mathematics, no formal equations, and few proportions in the Principia itself), he nonetheless determines basic requirements of such a system of explanations and provides conceptual instruments adequate for the formation of such a physical theory.

Keywords

Conceptual System Scalar Magnitude Tennis Ball Conservation Principle Oblique Impact 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Damerow
    • 1
  • Gideon Freudenthal
    • 2
  • Peter Mclaughlin
    • 3
  • Jürgen Renn
    • 4
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für BildungsforschungBerlin 33Germany
  2. 2.Cohn Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and IdeasTel Aviv UniversityRamat-Aviv, Tel AvivIsrael
  3. 3.Fachgruppe PhilosophieUniversität KonstanzKonstanz 1Germany
  4. 4.The Collected Papers of Albert EinsteinBoston UniversityBostonUSA

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