Clinical Correlations

  • Richard H. Winterbauer
  • David F. Dreis
  • Philip C. Jolly

Abstract

Consultation, communication, and cooperation between pulmonologist, thoracic surgeon, and pathologist are fundamental to good care of the pulmonary patient. Every day, questions abound that require input from all three specialties. A transbronchial biopsy shows patchy interstitial fibrosis. Is an open lung biopsy necessary? Where is the best area to biopsy in a patient with diffuse pulmonary infiltrates? An open pleural biopsy revealed carcinoma. Is it a primary lung tumor or metastasis from an extrathoracic primary, and what are the next steps in the evaluation? The patient may have legionnaire’s disease. What specimens must be obtained to diagnose this infection?

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiences Virus Chest Radiograph Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome Asbestos Exposure Computerize Axial Tomographic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard H. Winterbauer
  • David F. Dreis
  • Philip C. Jolly

There are no affiliations available

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