Macromechanics of Composites

  • Krishan Kumar Chawla
Part of the Materials Research and Engineering book series (MATERIALS)

Abstract

Laminated fibrous composites are made by bonding together two or more laminae. The individual unidirectional laminae or plies are oriented in such a manner that the resulting structural component has the desired mechanical and/or physical characteristics in different directions. Thus, one exploits the inherent anisotropy of fibrous composites to design a composite material having the appropriate properties.

Keywords

Laminate Composite Free Edge Laminate Thickness Moment Resultant Lamination Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    R.L. McCullough, Concepts of Fiber-Resin Composites, Marcel Dekker, New York, 1971, p. 16.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    A.E.H. Love, A Treatise on the Mathematical Theory of Elasticity, 4th ed., Dover, New York. 1952.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    S. Timoshenko and J.N. Goodier, Theory of Elasticity, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1951.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J.F. Nye, Physical Properties of Crystals, Oxford University Press, London, 1957.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    S.W. Tsai and H.T. Hahn, Introduction to Composite Materials, Technomic, Westport, CT, 1980.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    R.M. Jones, Mechanics of Composite Materials, Scripta Book Co., Washington, DC, 1975.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    R.M. Christensen, Mechanics of Composite Materials, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1979.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    J.C. Halpin, Primer on Composite Materials, 2nd ed., Technomic, Lancaster, PA, 1984.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    R.B. Pipes and N.J. Pagano, J. Composite Mater., 4, 538 (1970), Technomic, Lancaster, PA.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    R.B. Pipes and I.M. Daniel, J. Composite Mater., 5, 255 (1971), Technomic, Lancaster, PA.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    N.J. Pagano and R.B. Pipes, J. Composite Mater., 5, 50 (1971).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    R.B. Pipes and N.J. Pagano, J. Appl. Mech., 41, 668 (1974).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    R.B. Pipes, B.E. Kaminski, and N.J. Pagano, in Analysis of the Test Methods for High Modulus Fibers and Composites, ASTM STP 521, ASTM, Philadelphia, 1973, p. 218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    J.M. Whitney, in Analysis of the Test Methods for High Modulus Fibers and Composites, ASTM STP 521, ASTM, Philadelphia, 1973, p. 167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    D.W. Oplinger, B.S. Parker, and F.P. Chiang, Exp. Mech., 14, 747 (1974).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Suggested Reading

  1. L.R. Calcote, Analysis of Laminated Composite Structures, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1969.Google Scholar
  2. R.M. Christensen, Mechanics of Composite Materials, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1979.Google Scholar
  3. R.M. Jones, Mechanics of Composite Materials, Scripta Book Co., Washington, DC, 1975.Google Scholar
  4. S.W. Tsai and H.T. Hahn, Introduction to Composite Materials, Technomic, Westport, CT, 1980.Google Scholar
  5. J.R. Vinson and T.W. Chou, Composite Materials and Their Use in Structures, John Wiley &; Sons, New York, 1975.Google Scholar
  6. J.R. Vinson and R.L. Sierakowski, The Behavior of Structures Composed of Composite Materials, Martinus Nijhoff, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1986.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Krishan Kumar Chawla
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical EngineeringNew Mexico Institute of Mining and TechnologySocorroUSA

Personalised recommendations