Medical Text Processing: Past Achievements, Future Directions

  • Carol Friedman
  • Stephen B. Johnson
Part of the Computers in Health Care book series (HI)

Abstract

Natural language plays a central role in medicine. It is by far the most convenient means for health care personnel to convey medical information, particularly in terms of the amount of time required, the ease of use, and the completeness of representation. As a partial consequence of this, much crucial medical information is not available in any other form: The patient chart in most institutions consists largely of unstructured text, as does the vast majority of the medical literature. Moreover, natural language is unequaled as a general means of expressing complex meanings (Blois 1984).

Keywords

Natural Language Natural Language Processing Text Processing Unify Medical Language System Computational Linguistics 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol Friedman
  • Stephen B. Johnson

There are no affiliations available

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