The Rating Game

  • Richard L. Scheaffer
  • Ann Watkins
  • Mrudulla Gnanadesikan
  • Jeffrey A. Witmer
Part of the Textbooks in mathematical sciences book series (TIMS)

Abstract

As consumers, we are often faced with making decisions based on ratings, whether they are ratings of movies, the Nielson ratings of TV shows, or the car ratings of Consumer’s Report. U.S. News and World Report annually rates colleges and universities. To come up with the ratings, the magazine use data such as average SAT/ACT scores of their freshmen, the acceptance rate, financial resources, as well as the ratings of schools by the presidents, deans, and admissions directors. The elite schools compete with each other for the top ratings and use them to attract the best students. Do you know how your school did in this rating scheme? How others rate your school may not affect your day-to-day experiences at the school. This activity asks you to find out the level of satisfaction of your fellow students with three different aspects of your school that really matter to you: academic programs, physical plant, and extracurricular activities.

Keywords

Academic Program Extracurricular Activity Fellow Student Pilot Survey World Report 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard L. Scheaffer
    • 1
  • Ann Watkins
    • 2
  • Mrudulla Gnanadesikan
    • 3
  • Jeffrey A. Witmer
    • 4
  1. 1.University of FloridaUSA
  2. 2.California State UniversityNorthridgeUSA
  3. 3.Fairleigh Dickinson UniversityUSA
  4. 4.Oberlin CollegeUSA

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