Microphones and Other Transducers

  • Thomas D. Rossing
  • Neville H. Fletcher
Chapter

Abstract

In many practical applications it is necessary to convert acoustical signals into electrical signals, or vice versa, and for this purpose a variety of transducers may be used. The most common are microphones and loudspeakers, but other important transducers include accelerometers, which convert vibrational signals to electrical signals, and force transducers, which measure vibrational forces. The purpose of this chapter is to examine the principles underlying the most common examples of each type of transducer and to see how they operate. The technical details, which are extensive and varied, need not concern us here, though they are important in the practical world.

Keywords

Barium Titanate Acoustic Pressure Condenser Microphone Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate Diaphragm Motion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas D. Rossing
    • 1
  • Neville H. Fletcher
    • 2
  1. 1.Physics DepartmentNorthern Illinois UniversityDeKalbUSA
  2. 2.Department of Physical Sciences Research School of Physical Sciences and EngineeringAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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