Models of Legal Systems

  • Lenore E. A. Walker
  • David L. Shapiro
Chapter

Abstract

Although most of us studied U.S. history and the Constitution when we were in school, we rarely think about it in connection with the laws that we follow on a daily basis. Indeed, knowledge about the Constitution and its Bill of Rights is important to understand how our legal system works. This is true for any country’s laws, so a quick review of how the system in the U.S. works is in order here. If you live in another country, try to substitute your country’s Constitution and rules of law for those in the U.S. Obviously, those countries who use a democratic form of government will be closer to the U.S. system than those who have another form of government.

Keywords

Legal System Criminal Justice System Criminal Case Federal Court Juvenile Court 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Melton, G., Poythress, N., Petrila, J. & Slobogin, C. (1997). Psychological evaluations for the courts: 2nd Edition. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  2. Wrightsman, L. (2001). Forensic psychology. Cambridge, MA: WadsworthGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lenore E. A. Walker
    • 1
  • David L. Shapiro
    • 1
  1. 1.Nova Southeastern UniversityFt. LauderdaleUSA

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