Changes in Distribution of the Snub-Nosed Monkey in China

  • Baoguo Li
  • Zhiyun Jia
  • Ruliang Pan
  • Baoping Ren

Abstract

Snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus), or golden monkeys, are members of the subfamily Colobinae, family Cercopithecinae. They are very beautiful creatures, but are now distributed in very limited areas. The Sichuan species (Rhinopithecus roxellana), the Yunnan species (R. bieti), and the Guizhou species (R. brelichi) are endemic to China (Figure 1). Together with the Vietnamese species (R. avunculus), they were originally regarded as one genus (Napier and Napier, 1967). More recently they have been split, the Chinese forms being classified as one subgenus (R. [Rhinopithecus]) and the Vietnamese as another subgenus (R. [Prebytiscus]) (Jablonski and Peng, 1993; Jablonski, 1998a). Though limited to isolated regions, they form a graded array of species from R. avunculus in subtropical evergreen and deciduous broad-leaf forests at less than 1,000 m altitude to R. bieti in temperate, coniferous forests as high as 3,000 to 4,500 m where annual average temperatures hover near freezing (Pan and Yong, 1989; Boonratana and Le, 1998).

Keywords

Qing Dynasty Giant Panda Qinling Mountain Deciduous Broadleaf Forest Golden Monkey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Baoguo Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhiyun Jia
    • 3
  • Ruliang Pan
    • 4
  • Baoping Ren
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Biology, College of Life ScienceNorthwest UniversityXi’anChina
  2. 2.Field Research Center, Primate Research InstituteKyoto UniversityInuyamaJapan
  3. 3.Institute of ZoologyChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  4. 4.Department of Anatomy and Human BiologyThe University of Western AustraliaPerthAustralia
  5. 5.Department of Biology, College of Life ScienceNorthwest UniversityXi’anChina

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