Genetics and Population Dynamics

  • Laura K. Marsh

Abstract

The distribution, abundance, and demographic make up of primates living within fragments are an important component for understanding conservation needs of the species. Species response to habitat fragmentation and disturbance occurs in two phases (Wilcove et al., 1986). In the first phase, the species will try to adjust to modified habitats, while in the second phase, changes will occur in the demography of the population. The initial response to fragmentation includes changes in activity pattern, feeding, ranging, and other behaviors (Marsh, 1981; Johns, 1987; Johns and Skorupa, 1987; Menon, 1993), which in turn changes the demographics. Of primary concern is the genetic welfare of any species that remains in genetic or demographic isolation.

Keywords

Habitat Fragmentation Fragmented Habitat Metapopulation Model Black Howler Golden Monkey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura K. Marsh

There are no affiliations available

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