Applying Survival Data Methodology to Analyze Longitudinal Quality of Life Data

  • Lucile Awad
  • Emmanuel Zuber
  • Mounir Mesbah

Abstract

In metastatic cancer studies, the deterioration of the patient’s health status is often observed during the trial either because of the toxicity of treatment or the progression of disease. This deterioration is very likely to be reflected in the patient’s quality of life. Therefore, when analyzing the global health status/quality-of-life (QL) score of the EORTC QLQ-C30 instrument, an event, QL deterioration can be defined in terms of health states. Deterioration could be characterized by an absorbing state (similar to death when analyzing survival time). We define only two kinds of events, so repeated measures of QL are easily converted into time-to-event data, and the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank tests can be used for analysis. We apply this methodology to data from a clinical trial of treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer.

Keywords

Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Best Supportive Care Cancer Clinical Trial Deterioration Level Change Ofat 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lucile Awad
    • 1
  • Emmanuel Zuber
    • 1
  • Mounir Mesbah
    • 2
  1. 1.AventisFrance
  2. 2.Université de Bretagne-SudFrance

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