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Mesomechanics of Porous Materials Under Intense Dynamic Loading

  • Vitali F. Nesterenko
Chapter
Part of the High-Pressure Shock Compression of Condensed Matter book series (SHOCKWAVE)

Abstract

Intense dynamic loading of porous, granular materials results in a completely new class of phenomena, in comparison with their behavior considered in the previous chapter. It includes a complex geometry of plastic flow, as well as fracture and melting. The mechanical deformation (shock loading, plastic flow) of heterogeneous porous materials has an essentially multiscale nature. For example, the hierarchy of scales includes:
  • Macroscales. Length of shock impulse, typical length of deformable part of the material.

  • Mesoscales. Shock front thickness, shear band thickness, sizes of the particles and pores, sizes of fragmented material, size of plastic flow localized on the interfaces of particles, plastic flow around pores, spacing between shear bands, heat conductivity, and mass diffusion lengths. Very often this scale is close to the initial scale of material heterogeneity that makes the continuum approach problematic.

  • Microscales. Sizes of lattice defects (dislocations, point defects, twins), possible additional scales parameters reflecting the nonlinear interaction, and collective dynamic behavior in molecular systems.

Keywords

Shock Wave Granular Material Shock Compression Copper Powder Shock Loading 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vitali F. Nesterenko
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace EngineeringUniversity of California at San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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